OIF Newsletter Vol 2 No.10

VOLUME 2: OCTOBER 2018. NEWSLETTER

 

Dear Sirs,

THE BEAD: BEAUTY OR THE BEAST?

Beautiful and magnificent
You set me apart,
You adorn my head and chest,
My waist and wrists,
You ripple at my steps,
When I move to the beats,
When I strike a pose,
All eyes watch me,
Admiringly and Lovingly,
I only hope without a motive,
Whilst they sigh and dream at my beauty,
I move my body in rhythm to my beads!

The bead is a very important part of the African Culture. Every ethnic group on the African continent uses the bead for a variety of purposes which has transcended traditional usage to the field of religion and the secular world. Foremost of its uses is as an ornament of beauty. The beads come in different shapes and sizes and are made from materials such as wood, stone, sea shells, clay, animal skin and hair, rubber, glass etc. Beads are particularly used as adornments and the quality of the material used in making a bead signifies the social status and importance of the wearer. Beads can be worn on any part of the body and are particularly worn on the head, arms, wrist, chest, waist and ankle. They come in a variety of colours that add beauty and splendour. Kings and Nobles are distinguished from their subjects by the quality and colour of the beads used to adorn their thrones, crown, clothes and shoes. In fact, in some Cultures, such as the Agbor Culture, it was believed that a king in taking a bride only had to place or adorn her ankle with specific beads and by so doing, became his wife/queen. We do not know if this is still the status quo. What we are certain of however is that the Royals still wear beads on their wrists and ankles.

Women as we know are creatures of beauty and from time immemorial have been known to enhance that beauty with jewellery including beads.  Women particularly wear the beads around the hair, neck, waist, arms, wrist and ankles; strategic and sensual parts of the female body which is sure to garner attention, especially the attention of men. A woman adorned with beads can provide a very captivating and sensual picture especially where the beads form part of the costume of a female dancer. The stretch of her neck, sway of her hips and steps of her foot coupled with rattle and slide of the beads on her body as she dances in tune to the music can keep a man enthralled for the duration of the dance and ultimately lead him to seek her out afterwards.

One only wonders what motives push the man to seek the attention of the woman… love at first sight or the beast of lust awakened by the sensuality of the woman enhanced by the beads? Whilst love at first sight has proven to be an occurrence amongst young people, lust at the beauty and sensuality of a woman is all the more common and where not reciprocated may lead to the stalking and sometimes sexual harassment of the woman.

“What did you expect me to think when you danced so seductively?”

“Your beauty is killing me, I must have a taste”

“This your waist you moved so expertly to the music, I hope you will move it well for me”

“Baby, please give me a taste of your succulent body”

The words listed above become the rhetoric and excuses of the man as he plagues the woman to surrender to his needs and where he becomes desperate may resort to outright sexual assault.

The beads are a beautiful product of our culture and a lovely piece of adornment and should be appreciated, however, we must also be conscious of its implicit sensuality.

One only wonders what motives push the man to seek the attention of the woman… love at first sight or the beast of lust awakened by the sensuality of the woman enhanced by the beads? Whilst love at first sight has proven to be an occurrence amongst young people, lust at the beauty and sensuality of a woman is all the more common and where not reciprocated may lead to the stalking and sometimes sexual harassment of the woman.

“What did you expect me to think when you danced so seductively?”

“Your beauty is killing me, I must have a taste”

“This your waist you moved so expertly to the music, I hope you will move it well for me”

“Baby, please give me a taste of your succulent body”

The words listed above become the rhetoric and excuses of the man as he plagues the woman to surrender to his needs and where he becomes desperate may resort to outright sexual assault.

The beads are a beautiful product of our culture and a lovely piece of adornment and should be appreciated, however, we must also be conscious of its implicit sensuality.

The OIF would be pleased to have you join us in making a difference. We will appreciate your support towards our initiatives either by donating, sponsoring a GGISSG awardee or any of our other projects, subscribing to/ purchasing the 4th edition of our annual magazine “MINDS” which is set to be published in November, 2018, or partnering/ collaborating with us in making our annual event a success. It all depends on how far you can go.

To support our cause, please find below the OIF account details:

Bank Name: Zenith Bank

Account Number: 1013842933

Account Name: The Obi Ikenchukwu Foundation   

                                    OR

Bank: Access Bank

Account Number: 0739444546

Account Name: The Obi Ikenchukwu Foundation

Feel free to contact us via the contact details below or visit our website by clicking on the OIF logo above.

N.B: For any legal advice/opinion please contact Sceptre Legal Services via any of these numbers 08098300333.

Sceptre Legal Services is the preferred law firm that represents The Obi Ikenchukwu Foundation in all legal related matters.

The Obi Ikenchukwu Foundation

ADDRESS

Suite 016, Ahmadu Bello Way,

Victoria Island, Lagos.

EMAIL: info@theoifoundation.org

PHONE

+234-818-0000-923;

+234-809-8300-333;

+234-1460-5611;

+447950550818.

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FACEBOOK: The Obi Ikenchukwu Foundation “OIF”

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